The Museum Treating Home Cooking as Fine Art

LIKE MOST THINGS THIS YEAR, the National Museum of Women in the Arts’ Reclamation exhibition did not go as initially planned. Curator and director of public programs Melani N. Douglass wanted to treat kitchen labor—the often-invisible daily work that disproportionately falls on women and feminine people—as high art. She envisioned an exhibition centered around kitchen-like spaces physically installed at … Continue reading The Museum Treating Home Cooking as Fine Art

This Holiday Season, Can We Heal The Relationship Wounds of Politics?

The euphoria was contagious. Car horns clamored through Brooklyn. Under the arch in Grand Army Plaza, brass bands spontaneously serenaded dancing crowds. My neighbors shrieked, and from building to building, the city echoed with cheers: Joe Biden had been elected President.  I was happy — most of all, to see others’ joy. But I was also … Continue reading This Holiday Season, Can We Heal The Relationship Wounds of Politics?

Celebrate the Farm Workers Behind Your Favorite Thanksgiving Sides

AS WE SIT DOWN TO enjoy Thanksgiving dinner, whether around a table or with loved ones online, most of us won’t pause to wonder where those favorite family dishes come from. Yet each stalk of celery in your stuffing, each roasted turnip in grandma’s dutch oven, and every apple in your uncle’s famous pie connects us to the … Continue reading Celebrate the Farm Workers Behind Your Favorite Thanksgiving Sides

How to Recreate Your Lost Family Recipes, According to Historians and Chefs

Michael Twitty was leading a conversation on African diasporic food when the woman he was speaking to broke into tears. Twitty, a food writer, historian, and historical interpreter, had just explained that the word for “eat” in Wolof, a West African language, is nyam. The woman, a Massachusetts resident from an African-American and Puerto Rican family, had … Continue reading How to Recreate Your Lost Family Recipes, According to Historians and Chefs